Wednesday, January 16, 2008

World Equity Returns for 2008 and More Views


Joining the Downside - Above we see the 2008 performance of the S&P 500 Index (SPY) representing U.S. equities; the iShares EAFE (Europe, Australasia, Far East) ETF (EFA); and the iShares Emerging Markets Index ETF (EEM). We saw distinct underperformance of the U.S. market in 2007, but so far in 2008 we're seeing downside from the international ETFs as well. A global recession theme has implications not only for equities, but for rates and commodity prices.

Recommended Book - What is the What is the novelized autobiography of Valentino Achak Deng, a young man who survived incredible conditions in southern Sudan and shared his story with Dave Eggers. A very personal view of a troubled part of the world and one person's will to survive.

What's Up With Volatility? - Or why isn't it up more, given stock market weakness? VIX and More takes a look at the issue. Here's Adam Warner's take on the "pathetic" VIX.

McClellan Oscillators - I see Broadmarket is tracking the McClellan Oscillator; Decision Point computes the oscillator (and its volume counterpart) for the stocks specific to each major index and sector. Small caps are showing particular weakness, especially relative to the Dow stocks.

Health Care Topics - SharpBrains posts health care questions from 40 bloggers as issues for whomever is elected U.S. President.

4 comments:

Jeff Pietsch CFA, Esq said...

Brett, I was just thinking about this today:

http://marketrewind.blogspot.com/2008/01/why-sovereigns-are-buying-our.html

Jeff Pietsch CFA, Esq said...

PS - I'm fully in the bear camp, but this relative Tick strength continues to vex me... any thoughts?

alanj878 said...

yah I cant figure out why the bear trends seem to be affecting the stock market and Recession should never mention by affects of the stock market it is relative to unemployment.LIvely Money

Brett Steenbarger, Ph.D. said...

Hi Jeff,

The relative strength of the TICK even as stock prices have moved lower is indeed noteworthy. If we think of TICK as a sentiment measure, then it would appear that bullish sentiment is unable to sustain higher prices, something I've referred to as "inefficiency". I'll be looking into this further; thanks--

Brett